Bathroom Vanity Plans | Home Decor and Furniture Explorer | Hermeticresearch.Org

Bathroom Vanity Plans

By
0

There’s only so much room in the magazine, but for those who are interested in tackling this project, you might find it helpful to see some additional images to illustrate the finer points of the building process used to create this classic vanity. Get home building tips, offers, and expert advice in your inbox Sign Up × Use a track saw (or circular saw and cutting guide) to create a straight reference edge on each sheet of plywood. Read Justin Fink’s full article from Fine Homebuilding #252Build Your Own Bathroom Vanity Measuring off the reference edge, mark both ends of each sheet to help orient track (or cutting guide) for plywood cuts. A sheet of rigid foam under the plywood acts as sacrificial support for cutoffs. Read Justin Fink’s full article from Fine Homebuilding #252Build Your Own Bathroom Vanity Intentionally cut a bit oversized, each plywood part is then run through the tablesaw to ensure that each piece is consistently sized. Read Justin Fink’s full article from Fine Homebuilding #252Build Your Own Bathroom Vanity After ripping the poplar to rough width, take multiple passes through the thickness planer to clean up the edges and faces of each piece. Read Justin Fink’s full article from Fine Homebuilding #252Build Your Own Bathroom Vanity Use a miter saw to crosscut the poplar stock to final length. Read Justin Fink’s full article from Fine Homebuilding #252Build Your Own Bathroom Vanity A plywood sled holds the leg pieces at an angle, allowing them to be passed over the tablesaw to create the taper on the bottom edge. Read Justin Fink’s full article from Fine Homebuilding #252Build Your Own Bathroom Vanity The front legs are rabbeted by making two cuts on the tablesaw – on edge, and on the face – so that they can mate with the side panel assemblies. Read Justin Fink’s full article from Fine Homebuilding #252Build Your Own Bathroom Vanity Drill pocket holes in the end of the applicable poplar parts. Read Justin Fink’s full article from Fine Homebuilding #252Build Your Own Bathroom Vanity Align, clamp, and fasten the pocket hole joints to create each poplar subassembly. Read Justin Fink’s full article from Fine Homebuilding #252Build Your Own Bathroom Vanity Use the drawer front stock as a guide to size and align the position of the face frame stiles and rails. Read Justin Fink’s full article from Fine Homebuilding #252Build Your Own Bathroom Vanity To establish the location of the bottom rail, cut a spacer block from a scrap of plywood. Read Justin Fink’s full article from Fine Homebuilding #252Build Your Own Bathroom Vanity To accommodate the side panels, rout the backside of each side assembly, making progressive passes with a rabbeting bit to reach the marked depth. Read Justin Fink’s full article from Fine Homebuilding #252Build Your Own Bathroom Vanity Use a sharp chisel to clean up the rounded corners left from the rabbeting bit. Read Justin Fink’s full article from Fine Homebuilding #252Build Your Own Bathroom Vanity Set each MDF side panel into a bead of wood glue. Read Justin Fink’s full article from Fine Homebuilding #252Build Your Own Bathroom Vanity Use a pin nailer to tack in thin pieces of backer wood around each panel. Read Justin Fink’s full article from Fine Homebuilding #252Build Your Own Bathroom Vanity Screw together pairs of plywood dividers in preparation for the case assembly. Read Justin Fink’s full article from Fine Homebuilding #252Build Your Own Bathroom Vanity Attach each plywood subassembly to the continuous plywood bottom piece, using just a few nails to temporarily hold each piece. Read Justin Fink’s full article from Fine Homebuilding #252Build Your Own Bathroom Vanity With the dividers in place, add the shelf support stretchers and top cleats. Read Justin Fink’s full article from Fine Homebuilding #252Build Your Own Bathroom Vanity Only tacked in place, the plywood dividers can be knocked into alignment with the face frame before fastening it in place. Read Justin Fink’s full article from Fine Homebuilding #252Build Your Own Bathroom Vanity Tackle the wood top glue up in stages – first glue together pairs, and then glue the pairs together – to make for a stress-free process. Read Justin Fink’s full article from Fine Homebuilding #252Build Your Own Bathroom Vanity After the glue is dry, use the circular saw to cut the top to length.   Read Justin Fink’s full article from Fine Homebuilding #252 Build Your Own Bathroom Vanity Sand both sides of the top, working through the grit until you reach 220. Read Justin Fink’s full article from Fine Homebuilding #252Build Your Own Bathroom Vanity Use a chamfer bit to ease the top and bottom edges of the counter, which can then be further eased with sandpaper to create a subtle, flattened curve. Read Justin Fink’s full article from Fine Homebuilding #252Build Your Own Bathroom Vanity Before applying any finish to the top, use a jigsaw to cut the opening for the drop-in sink. Read Justin Fink’s full article from Fine Homebuilding #252Build Your Own Bathroom Vanity Use a crosscut sled on the table saw to create the stub tenons on the door rails. Read Justin Fink’s full article from Fine Homebuilding #252Build Your Own Bathroom Vanity Left a touch on the tight side, the tenons are easy to slim up using sandpaper glued to a block. Read Justin Fink’s full article from Fine Homebuilding #252Build Your Own Bathroom Vanity Assemble the doors with MDF panels, leaving the stiles long so they can be trimmed later. Read Justin Fink’s full article from Fine Homebuilding #252Build Your Own Bathroom Vanity Once dry, use the tablesaw to cut the top and bottom edges of each door. Read Justin Fink’s full article from Fine Homebuilding #252Build Your Own Bathroom Vanity A simple T-shaped router jig and mortise bit can be used to create perfect mortises for the door hinges. Read Justin Fink’s full article from Fine Homebuilding #252Build Your Own Bathroom Vanity With hinges installed on the doors, hold each door in the opening and mark where the hinges meet the face frame. Read Justin Fink’s full article from Fine Homebuilding #252Build Your Own Bathroom Vanity After fitting the doors, remove them and drill holes to receive the glue-in wooden knobs. A piece of painters tape wrapped around the drill bit acts as a visual depth reference when drilling. Read Justin Fink’s full article from Fine Homebuilding #252Build Your Own Bathroom Vanity After tacking the drawer fronts in place (or temporarily attaching them with double-stick tape) open each drawer and permanently fasten the front from the inside using screws. Read Justin Fink’s full article from Fine Homebuilding #252Build Your Own Bathroom Vanity Fully assembled, the vanity is ready for paint or stain before installation. Read Justin Fink’s full article from Fine Homebuilding #252Build Your Own Bathroom Vanity Launch Slideshow
Bathroom Vanity Plans bathroom vanity plans 1

ProjectsAs seen on HGTV’s Open Concept…Free PlansDIY CraftsReader ProjectsFurnitureHolidaysShanty StyleOutdoor ProjectsGiftsFree PrintablesAshley’s House BuildWall DecorWindow TreatmentsStorage SolutionsKnock-OffsVideo TutorialsWoodworking ProjectsBabies and KidsAbout UsPressFree PlansVideosBlogContactToolsSubmit Your ProjectShanty 2 ChicTurning shanty to chic one bargain at a timeEmailFacebookGoogle+InstagramPinterestTwitterYouTubeProjectsAs seen on HGTV’s Open Concept…Free PlansDIY CraftsReader ProjectsFurnitureHolidaysShanty StyleOutdoor ProjectsGiftsFree PrintablesAshley’s House BuildWall DecorWindow TreatmentsStorage SolutionsKnock-OffsVideo TutorialsWoodworking ProjectsBabies and KidsAbout UsPressFree PlansVideosBlogContactToolsSubmit Your ProjectDIY Farmhouse Bathroom VanityFebruary 1, 2016 By Shanty2ChicHey there! Join us on Instagram and Pinterest to keep up with our most recent projects and sneak peeks!Check out our new how-to videos on YouTube! Make sure to subscribe to our channel so you don’t miss any!Hey there! Join us on Instagram and Pinterest to keep up with our most recent projects and sneak peeks!Check out our new how-to videos on YouTube! Make sure to subscribe to our channel so you don’t miss any!Hey hey friends!  To say I am excited about this project today would be an extreme understatement.  This room has been in the works longer than I care to admit, but I finally got around to finishing it and I LOVE THE RESULTS!  Check out my oldest son’s new bathroom and his new farmhouse bathroom vanity!Isn’t she pretty??  I for real might trade him bathrooms.As always, I will share the entire build with you here, and you can download and print our free plans by clicking HERE!First I want to tell you where I found all the goodies to finish off this space!  Let’s start with the tile… Wow.  Wow.  I worked with one of our favorite brands for this part.  I found all of the tile for the bathroom at The Tile Shop!  Below I will link to each tile so you can find it on their site.Pillowed Marble Subway TileMarble Trim PiecesAdoni Black Slate Floor TileAnd now for the rest of the goodies!  This vanity is designed to fit a drop-in sink.  I found mine on Wayfair. I wanted something that covered most of the countertop to keep my son from getting too much water on the wood.  HERE is the drop-in sink I found.The amazing mirror and light are also from Wayfair.Wall MirrorLOVE the light and it’s price tag!Progress Lighting Archie LightI also found his shower curtain and curtain rod on Wayfair!Now to build the vanity!  This really isn’t a difficult build…. If you can get the angle cuts down, the rest is very basic.I started by building two sides.  These are constructed out of 3/4″ Purebond Plywood.  This type of plywood is sold in big 4’x8′ sheets, and we have the guys at Home Depot rip it down into smaller boards to fit in the car.  Then, we cut those boards to exact size using our miter saws or table saws.  I cut mine to size and then added 3/4″ pocket holes down the sides and top.  The top pocket holes will be used attach the wood countertop.  If you are doing just a drop in sink top/countertop with no wood below it, you can skip those pocket holes.Next, I cut and attached the legs.  These are made of 2×3 boards.  Rather than just purchasing 2×3, we like to purchase 2×4 and cut the rounded edges off to make it a very square 2×3.  You do this by running each end through a table saw.  I love the look!After attaching both legs, I added the X trim pieces.  I used 1/2″ craft boards for this part.  They can usually be found by the 1x pine boards at the hardware store.  I used pine for this part as well.  I found the easiest way to get these angles was by laying the board down on the side of the vanity and drawing where my cuts should go.I attached each board using my Ryobi 18v brad nailer with 3/4″ nails and wood glue beneath each board.After building both sides, I attached them with the front and back frame pieces.  These will also be attached using 3/4″ pocket holes and 1.25″ pocket hole screws.The base of the vanity is also Purebond.  I added 3/4″ pocket holes around the base of the whole thing before attaching to the inside of the cabinet.Here she is ready for her door!I cut the door pieces to size on this part, and then added 3/4″ pocket holes to both ends of each shorter board.Then, I made a frame with those 4 boards using 1.25″ pocket hole screws.The backing is 1/4″ Purebond plywood.  I attached this using wood glue and 3/4″ staples with my Ryobi 18g stapler.Next, I added the X detail using the same method I did on the sides by marking where my cuts would be. Now for the top!  Again, yours may just be a drop in top similar to what I used on my last vanity.  If so, you won’t need the wood top I am about to show you.  I built mine by starting with a piece of 3/4″ Purebond plywood cut the size of the countertop I wanted minus 1.25″ all around.Then, I planked the top with 1/2″x 4″ oak boards.  I used wood glue and nails to hold these in place.I trimmed the outside of the countertop with 1×2 oak boards.Next, I laid my sink template on top and used my Ryobi jigsaw to cut along the line for the sink.To do this, I started by making a pilot hole with my drill.  This will allow me to drop my jigsaw blade into it to start my cut.This is the blade I used…Then, I just cut around the line.Then, I made sure it fit!I stained the countertop with Varathane Dark Walnut stain.After it dried, I added two coats of Varathane Triple Thick Poly.This says GLOSS BUT I used Satin!I painted the entire cabinet with Varathane Chalked paint in Charcoal and then lightly sanded my edges to distress it a bit.  I also added one coat of Triple Thick to the cabinet base.These are the hinges I used to attach the door.  They are from Home Depot.And this is what I used for the door latch, also from Depot!Here it is all finished up!How pretty is the faucet guys?  I worked with Moen on the finish out of this space.  The faucet is a Weymouth Oil Rubbed Bronze one-handle bathroom faucet.I’ve also had a ton of questions about the tank lever.  It is also a Moen Weymouth tank lever in oil rubbed bronze.And the Weymouth paper holder has become a game changer in my house.  This design is amazing!  It makes changing the toilet paper roll so much easier… It’s the little things

No Comments

Leave a Reply